Our Services

What is it?

This is an x-ray examination to look at the inside of your oesophagus (gullet), stomach and beginning of your Barium Mealsmall bowel. For this examination to be performed, it is necessary for the stomach to be empty (i.e. you will need to fast).

 

Why have it?

The reason for the test is best explained to you by your referring doctor. It is often used to look for ulcers or reflux (heartburn) as well as many other conditions.

 

How long does it take?

About 15-30 minutes.

 

What do I have to do?

Prior to the examination, you cannot eat, drink or smoke for 12 hours before the examination (therefore no breakfast). If you need to take essential medicine, this can be done with small sips of water.

If you are diabetic or have a condition which you think may affect your examination or your health, please inform the staff when making your appointment.

The examination will be carried out on an x-ray table. You will be asked to drink a barium mixture as well as two small bitter tasting mixtures. These will produce gas in your stomach and you may feel bloated and wish to belch - please try not to as it is important to keep the gas in your stomach. During the examination, you will be asked to move into various positions. You may be given an injection of Buscopan to relax the muscles in your stomach.

 

Where is it performed?
All barium meal examinations are performed at our Campbell Street rooms.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss costs.


If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

A biopsy is a procedure in which samples of tissue are obtained via a needle.  It is done with the help of imaging equipment so that the needle can be inserted directly into the location of the abnormality.

 

Why have it?

The procedure will allow accurate diagnosis of the problem, usually a lump.  It will hopefully confirm the nature of the problem.

 

How long does it take?

It depends on what area is being examined – between about 20-30 minutes.  The specimen is sent to a pathology lab which can take up to three working days to analyse the specimen and return a result.  You can contact your referring doctor regarding these results.

 

What do I have to do?

There is usually no preparation but it is best not to have just eaten.

You will be required to sign a consent form as it is an invasive procedure.

 

What does the procedure involve?

The procedure may be done under either CT or ultrasound guidance depending on which is appropriate for your problem.

In nearly all cases, local anaesthetic will be given to numb the area.  Unfortunately the anaesthetic may sting a little.  Once this is done a further needle, or needles, will be inserted into the lump to obtain the cells necessary for diagnosis – this may be done a number of times.

Afterwards you may need pain killers e.g. Panadol, as there may be some pain.  Also, a small bruise may appear.  It is best not to take Aspirin as this may increase bruising.

Areas commonly biopsied (all performed at Western Imaging Group) include thyroid, breast, lymph node and abdomen.


Where is it performed?
All biopsies are performed at our Campbell Street rooms.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss costs.


If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

CT (computed tomography) is a means of looking inside your body using x-rays, in cross section i.e. like slices of bread in a loaf.  You will simply lie still on a bed and part of you will move into a large doughnut like CT Scanstructure.

To become claustrophobic is extremely uncommon.

 

Why have it?

The procedure will often allow accurate diagnosis of the problem.  CT however does not have all the answers and some diseases may not be able to be detected.  Other imaging tests, e.g. ultrasound, may be necessary for further diagnosis.

 

How long does it take?

The actual scan time is usually only seconds.  The computer then must reconstruct the images and then the films must be printed.          

   

What do I have to do?

For certain tests, you will be required to sign a consent form and answer some questions, for example, regarding your allergies (if you have any) and medications.

For some scans it will be necessary for you to fast for a short period of time.  For others, usually abdominal scans, it will be necessary for you to drink some special CT contrast about 1 hour prior to the examination.  For some scans, an injection of contrast medium may need to be given and this will provide additional diagnostic information.

 

Are there any side-effects?

You are exposed to a small dose of radiation which is extremely unlikely to cause side-effects.

If you have an injection, you may get a warm feeling, bad taste in your mouth or urge to go to the toilet.  These are all temporary, lasting only seconds.  Nausea may occur.  Itchiness or rash or more serious reactions are not common.  If you are pregnant, or think you might be, please inform the radiographer before the test.


Where is it performed?
CT scans are performed at our Campbell Street and Plumpton rooms. All CT guided spinal pain therapy is performed at Eastbrooke CT - Colo Lane.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss costs.


If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

Dental imaging includes OPG (orthopantogram) and cephalometry.  These x-rays image the teeth and Dental Imagingsurrounding structures of the mouth e.g. mandible and maxilla.

 

Why have it?

Your doctor or dentist will let you know why they are referring you for dental imaging; most commonly they are done before having braces fitted or to check for periodontal disease (disease of the tissues).

 

How long does it take?

Only a few minutes.

 

What do I have to do?

There is no preparation for this examination, except to remove earrings and necklaces.  Instructions will be given to you before commencement of the examination regarding positioning of your head etc.


Where is it performed?
Dental imaging is performed at our Campbell Street rooms.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss costs.


If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

DXA stands for Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry.  It takes measurements from the lumbar spine (lower back) and femoral neck (hip) which are then calculated to give the average bone mineral density for both regions.

The scan is able to tell you if your bones show significant demineralisation or if you fit the criteria for osteoporosis.

 

How long does it take?

Approximately 15 minutes.

 

What do I have to do?

There is no preparation for this examination.

 

Where is it performed?
DXA is performed at our Campbell Street rooms.

 

Do I have to pay?

Some DXA examinations are not covered by Medicare.  Certain criteria must be met in order to bulk bill this examination (see below).  When making an appointment please check with the receptionist who will be able to tell you if we can bulk bill the examination.

 

DXA CLASSIFICATION FOR BULK BILLING REBATE

Item 12306

For the confirmation of a presumptive diagnosis of low bone mineral density made on the basis of one or more fractures occurring after minimal trauma i.e. plain x-ray evidence or CT evidence.

OR

For the monitoring of low bone mineral density proven by done densitometry at least 12 months previously.

Item 12312

For the diagnosis and monitoring of bone loss associated with one or more of the following conditions:

    Prolonged gluco-corticoid therapy
    Conditions associated with excess gluco-corticoid secretion
    Male hypogonadism
    Female hypogonadism

Item 12315

For the diagnosis and monitoring of bone loss associated with one or more of the following conditions:

    Primary hyperparathyroidism
    Chronic liver failure
    Chronic renal disease
    Proven malabsorptive disorder
    Rheumatoid arthritis
    Conditions associated with thyroxine excess

Item 12321

For the measurement of bone density 12 months following a significant change in therapy for established low bone density.

Item 12323

For patients over 70 years of age (unlimited services without restriction).

 


If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

EOS is an ultra-low dose 3D imaging system. It allows a full view of your skeleton with the benefit of significant dose reduction (50% less than a normal x-ray). Frontal and lateral digital images are captured simultaneously, and a 3D rendering of specific skeletal anatomies may be made.

 

EOSWhy have it?

EOS imaging is used for diagnosis of bony pathology. It is especially useful in imaging of the spine, lower limbs, hips, knees and can even provide whole body imaging. It is used routinely by many surgeons for pre and post operative assessment of alignment spinal surgery, hip and knee surgery.

 

How long does it take?

About 5 minutes (the actual scan can take as little as 20 seconds).

 

What do I have to do?

There is no preparation for this examination.

 

Where is it performed?

All EOS Imaging is performed at Cnr Colo and Kelso Lanes, Blacktown.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss cost.

 

If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

X-rays are a type of electromagnetic radiation that can be used to penetrate the soft tissues of the body.  This allows the radiologist to see bone, muscle, fat, fluid and any contrasting material.

General X-RayWhen you think of x-rays it is no doubt general x-rays that you picture.

These include the following:

Chest X-Ray

This looks at the structures of the chest and allows the radiologist to assess the lungs and heart region.

Abdomen X-Ray

This demonstrates the internal structures of the abdomen and allows the radiologist to identify abnormal bowel patterns or assess for kidney stones.

Skull, Sinuses and Facial Bones X-Ray

This allows the radiologist to identify any problems relating to the regions of the head.

Spinal X-Rays

This includes the cervical spine (neck), thoracic spine (torso) and lumbar spine (lower back) and allows the radiologist to assess the bones of the spine.

Extremities

These include regions such as hands, fingers, toes, feet, knees, ankles etc. and allow the radiologist to assess the bones and soft tissue structures of the area examined.

 

Where is it performed?

General x-rays are performed at Campbell Street, Plumpton and Seven Hills.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss cost.

 


If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

A mammogram is a low dose x-ray examination which shows the internal features of your breast.  It is one of the Mammogramways to detect breast cancer, often at an early stage before a lump is felt.

Unfortunately not all cancers can be detected by mammography.

 

Why have it?

The principal reason is to detect breast cancer.

 

How long does it take?

Between about 15-30 minutes.

 

What do I have to do?

Before the examination you must ensure you have washed all talcum powder, perfume or deodorant from around the breast area.

Please wear loose fitting clothing – skirt/pants and top are preferable to a dress and the skirt/pants can be left on during the procedure, thus privacy and warmth can be maintained.

 

What does the procedure involve?

Your breast needs to be compressed as flat as possible to obtain appropriate views of the internal structure. The majority of patients tolerate this procedure very well; however some people can unfortunately find the compression uncomfortable or even painful.

 

Where is it performed?

Mammograms are performed at our Women's Imaging Centre.

 

Do I have to pay?

Medicare has placed some restrictions on what is covered for mammography (see below).
If you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss cost.


CLINICAL NOTES FOR REQUEST APPROVED BY MEDICARE

  • Symptoms/signs or suspicion of breast malignancy found on an examination
  • Past history or occurrence of breast malignancy in the patient or family history of malignancy
  • The presence or suspicion of a lump or mass or nodule
  • The presence of localised breast pain or tenderness

INDICATIONS NOT APPROVED BY MEDICARE

  • No clinical indication
  • Screening
  • Cyst or follow up cyst
  • Generalised/cyclical tenderness
  • Follow up previous benign lump

 


If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

An injection of Cortisone can be made (under ultrasound or CT control) into the joints and musculo-skeletal areas.

 

Why have it?

The injection is for the relief of pain in conditions such as subacromial bursitis (inflammation overlying the shoulder tendons) and plantar fasciitis (inflammation of the plantar fascia connective tissue in the heel).

It can be done in joints such as the shoulder or hip, or into the soft tissue such as the foot.  The radiologist will inject a local anaesthetic as well as a steroid (this will sting a little).

 

How long does it take?

Approximately 15 minutes.

 

What do I have to do?

There is no preparation for this examination.

 

Where is it performed?

All MSK and joint injections are performed at our Campbell Street rooms.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss cost.

 

If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

Nuchal translucency measurement is an ultrasound examination which assesses the risk of having a baby with a chromosomal abnormality, for example Down Syndrome.

Nuchal TranslucencyNuchal translucency scanning must be done early in the pregnancy, between 11 and 14 weeks. The test measures the thickness of a small fluid collection on the back of the baby’s (foetus’) neck.  This thickness is measured then analysed by a special computer programme which calculates the risk of having a baby with a chromosomal abnormality.

The remainder of the developing baby (foetus) will also be imaged at the time of the examination.

A blood test is necessary for the results and we will provide you with a referral to have one done.

Nuchal translucency scanning has a sensitivity of about 80% taking into account the mother’s age, other measurements and blood tests.  (A low risk result does not mean there is no risk).

 

Why have it?

The vast majority of babies are born normal; however all women, whatever their age, do have a small risk of delivering a baby with a physical and/or mental problem.

 

How long does it take?

The scan itself takes approximately 30 minutes, depending on the position of the foetus.  A blood test must then be conducted.  Once the blood test results are received, these are collated with the other data received at the time of the scan and full results are produced.  All up, results can take up to three working days.

 

What do I have to do?

Preparation is like a normal pregnancy ultrasound.  You will be asked to drink water at a specific time (depending on the time of your appointment) and hold onto it.  

 

Where is it performed?

All Nuchal Translucency ultrasounds are performed at our Campbell Street rooms.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss cost.

 

 

If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

Nuclear medicine uses very small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose or treat some diseases in a safe and painless way.  These materials are called radiotracers and they collect in certain parts of the body for a short time. While the tracer stays in the body, it can be used to show parts of the body through a nuclear medicine scan.

The tracer collects in parts of the body for a short time and gives off a small amount of energy in the form of gamma rays.  This energy is picked up by a special camera, and with the help of a computer makes pictures that help your doctor to diagnose conditions such as cancer, heart disease, thyroid disease, bone disease and fractures.

 

Is Nuclear Medicine Safe?

Yes, nuclear medicine is very safe.  The amount of tracer used is very small and it quickly loses its radioactivity.  It leaves your body in the first few hours or days following the test.

Please notify us if you are pregnant or breastfeeding prior to your test.

 

How Long Does It Take?

Firstly, you will be given the tracer.  This is usually injected into a vein in your arm, but sometimes you breathe it in, or perhaps take it in as a drink or food, depending on the test being performed.

The pictures are commonly taken immediately after the tracer is given and a few hours later, or possibly 24 to 48 hours later.  This is because it takes different lengths of time for the tracer to reach the part of your body to be examined.

In the time between receiving the tracer and your scan, you may be able to go away.  Staff will tell you what time to come back.  They will also tell you what you can or cannot do while you are away.

After the scan, you may be asked to wait while the pictures are checked.  Sometimes, more pictures are needed to see certain areas better or to be sure that the area being scanned is fully covered. Generally, you can go back to your normal activities after your nuclear medicine scan, including going to work.  If there are any special instructions, you will be told before you leave.

 

Patient Preparation for Nuclear Medicine Scans.

For all Nuclear Medicine Scans:

  • Bring referral.
  • Bring Medicare card.
  • Wear comfortable clothing.
  • Remove all jewellery or metal from clothing.


Common Nuclear Medicine Scan Instructions

Bone Scan

  • No preparation.
  • Bring in previous relevant scans ie. X-ray, CT, MRI, Ultrasound.

Lung Scan

  • No preparation.
  • Bring in previous relevant scans ie. X-ray, CT, MRI, Ultrasound.

MIBI (Cardiac) Scan

  • No caffeine products (ie tea, coffee, chocolate, milo, cola or decaffeinated products) for 24 hours prior to scan.
  • Nil to eat or drink (apart from water) 4 hours prior to test.
  • No theophylline-based medications for 24 hours prior to test.
  • No beta-blockers and calcium antagonists for 24 hours prior to study.
  • Wear comfortable clothing.
  • Bring in all current medications.
  • If diabetic please take ½ insulin dose with light breakfast 4 hours prior to test.

Renal Scan

  • Drink 1 litre of water prior test (unless on fluid restrictions).
  • Bring in previous relevant scans i.e. X-ray, CT, MRI, Ultrasound.
  • Hepatobiliary (HIDA) Scan.
  • Fast 4-5 hours prior scan. A light meal must be consumed prior this. Do not over-fast.
  • No morphine/buscopan for 24 hours.

Thyroid Scan

  • No thyroxine for 10 days prior to study.
  • No neomercazole 5 days prior to study.
  • No CT contrast administered 4 o 6 weeks prior to study.
  • No kelp or iodine supplements 4 to 6 weeks prior to study.
  • Bring most recent neck ultrasound/ CT.


Where is it performed?

All Nuclear Medicine scans are performed at our Grafton Street rooms.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss cost.

 

 

If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9834 8888 or via email.

Dr Matthew Lee specialises in spinal pain therapy and has trained in both Australia as well as in Europe to gain considerable expertise in this area.

At Western Imaging Group we provide the following services to help manage spinal pain:

  • Epidural steroid injection/Periradicular therapy
  • Sacro-iliac joint injection
  • Facet joint injection
  • Discography
  • Facet joint denervation
  • Medial branch block
  • Myelography
  • Pars defect injection
  • Synovial cyst aspiration

 

If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

Ultrasound uses high frequency sound waves to produce a picture/image of your internal organs/anatomy.

UltrasoundThe sound waves (which cannot be heard) produced by the machine bounce off your internal organs and are then detected by the machinery so that an image can be produced on the screen. Doppler ultrasound looks at blood flow (speed and direction) in your arteries and veins.  With this form of ultrasound the sound waves can be heard as well as an image being produced.

 

Why have it?

The reason for the test is best explained to you by your referring doctor.  It can be used to diagnose numerous conditions as well as look at the developing baby (foetus).

 

How long does it take?

It depends on what is being examined – between about 15 minutes to 1 hour.    

                                                   

What do I have to do?

Depending on what part of your body is being examined, there may be no preparation or you may need to fast for up to 6 hours or you may need to drink a number of glasses of water to fill your bladder.  The reception staff will explain what is necessary.

Again, depending on what part of your body is being examined, the examination may be carried out standing, sitting or lying.  Slippery gel will be put on the part of your body to be examined.  This is necessary to help transmit the sound waves in to your body.  A transducer/probe will then be put on the gel and the probe will be moved by the sonographer and an image produced.

The examination is not painful, but in some cases you may experience some discomfort from the pressure of the transducer, particularly if it is overlying an area where you are complaining of pain.

Ultrasound examinations performed at Western Imaging Group include general (e.g. pelvic and abdominal ultrasounds), musculoskeletal (e.g. shoulder), doppler (e.g. leg veins or arteries), obstetric (e.g. morphology and dating scans), gynaecological (e.g. female pelvic ultrasound) and small parts (e.g. thyroid).

 

Where is it done?

Ultrasound locations can be found here.

 

Do I have to pay?

All current Medicare card holders are bulk billed, if you are not covered by Medicare please contact the practice directly to discuss cost.

 

 

 

If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

What is it?

MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.  It uses a large magnet to provide detailed images of your internal organs/anatomy.Upright MRI

 

Why have it?

The reason for the test is best explained to you by your referring doctor.  It can be used to diagnose numerous conditions.

 

How long does it take?

About 45-60 minutes.

 

What do I have to do?

There is no preparation for an MRI, however you must ensure there is no metal on your person, this includes jewellery and clothes.  A gown can be provided if necessary.  You must inform the receptionist or radiographer if there is the possibility of any foreign bodies within your anatomy, e.g. shrapnel from accident, fragments from metal work etc.

 

Where is it performed?

Upright MRI is located at 3 Colo Lane Blacktown.


Do I have to pay?

Medicare has placed restrictions on what is covered (see below). If you are unsure if you are covered please contact the practice directly.

 

For Patients Under 16 Years of Age

MRI HEAD

  • Unexplained seizure(s)
  • Unexplained chronic headache where significant pathology is suspected
  • Paranasal sinus which has not responded to conservative therapy  

MRI KNEE

  • Internal joint derangement

MRI SPINE (C/L/T/S)

  • Significant trauma
  • Unexplained neck or back pain with associated neurological signs
  • Unexplained back pain where significant pathology is suspected  

MRI ELBOW

  • Significant fracture or avulsion injury is suspected that will change management  

MRI WRIST

  • Scaphoid fracture is suspected

MRI HIP

  • Suspected septic arthritis
  • Suspected slipped capital femoral epiphysis
  • Suspected Perthe’s disease

For Patients Over 16 Years of Age
MRI HEAD

  • Unexplained seizure(s)
  • Unexplained chronic headache where significant pathology is suspected

MRI KNEE

  • Inability to extend knee suggesting the possibility of an acute meniscal tear
  • Clinical findings suggestive of acute anterior ligament tear

MRI CERVICAL SPINE

  • Cervical radiculopathy
  • Cervical spine trauma

 

If you require any further information, or have any questions, please ask the receptionist, radiographer or radiologist before the examination is performed.

Alternatively, you can contact the practice on 9622 2292 or via email.

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